Naming cregox school


#1
The background picture contains both one of the first things we learn to name (house) and a place I'd like the school to be (in a castle) :P

Recently a friend who was interested in learning IT (more specifically programming in a particular language, called Processing) brought this book to my attention: Nature of Code, as a reference to what he was studying, and asked me what I think.

I replied to him I think the book has a terrible name. It should be called something like "Nature of Processing Code". It's still an ambiguous name, but at least it would bring the book's main topic in its name: a programming language called Processing.

Why are names so important?

I believe naming is the most important aspect of any language (there's probably a TED talk for that). We can only construct any rational thought after learning names. Every single word we use to communicate is in fact a name of some thing.

Monty Python's mostly unrelated film

Monty Python's mostly unrelated film

Some studies reveal learning a language is simply a matter of learning words in it. Starting at around 1000 words you can begin to communicate pretty well - no need for grammar, verb tenses, etc. Also one could argue the main goal in living is naming things.

Usually programmers will ignore this. We need to give names to a lot of things. But often we use "x", "foo" or whatever non-descriptive name. We rationalize it's because it's irrelevant to give a proper name. Or maybe we think it should be obvious by its functionality, or it doesn't matter, or we need to save space to reduce file size / lines of code / counting of letters. This bad naming brings high costs down the road... But that's a whole other subject. Suffice to say for now, always give good names.

This is the subject of the first topic in any class I'd give relating to computers or languages.

Short post today. :)


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at http://www.cregox.com/blog/2014/9/29/naming-cregox-school

Yet another software unsketched and unamed idea: a kind of tetris